Tag Archives: original streaming entertainment



Media Interview
March 7, 2018

The Joys of Interviewing

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Something that most people don’t realize is that when you are having a conversation with someone, you are essentially interviewing them. That’s why when you interview someone, you should be having a conversation. We’ve all heard or watched interviews where the host is going through a list of questions. It’s boring.

Every interviewer has their own style. Personally, if I can get a 30-minute interview out of a two-hour conversation, that’s a success. My approach to interviewing a guest is to make them feel comfortable – maybe even talk about things that aren’t directly related to what they’re doing. I slowly work my questions in. Not in a direct way. I want them to walk away wondering if they had just been interviewed, or if they just hung out for two hours talking to a friend. To me, that is what makes Motor City Juke Joint  on New Radio Media so unique and personal. It’s people talking about music.

I’ve done well over 100 interviews. Some of them were live on air. Some of them were recorded. A few of those will never see the light of day. There’s one in particular that stands out. I won’t name the person that I interviewed, because he is rather well known. The interview was conducted via phone. He was on tour and didn’t have time to stop by the studio. Anyone that has met me, or listened to my show, knows that I’m a talker. This person… was not. He responded with mostly one or two word answers. Sometimes with a sentence. It wasn’t until I brought up his other career as a college professor that the interview changed direction. Instead of talking about music, we started talking about math and how it was relaxing to him. He told me that when he gets off stage he immediately starts working on math equations. That’s how he unwinds after a performance.

Whether you’re a musician, actor, or even a broadcaster – everyone needs to decompress. Some drink and socialize. Others prefer quiet.  Some like to exercise their minds. We all have our own way.

About the Author:

Ben Rose - Host of Motor City Juke Joint on New Radio Media

 

Ben Rose
Host of Motor City Juke Joint on New Radio Media.
Watch it LIVE every Tuesday and Thursday at 7 pm EST!
Catch up on episodes you missed – all are available On Demand.

Get it on Google Play

Download on the App Store

 

So You Want to Be a Promter
March 22, 2018

So You Want to be a Promoter – part 1

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Let me start off by asking, “What the hell is wrong with you?”

All kidding aside, that’s really a question that you should ask yourself. I’ve been a promoter for close to 13 years now. Initially, I thought that it was going to be easy. I thought that it wouldn’t really cost anything – that I was going to do it for the music. In reality, it was hard, and expensive.

Most people don’t realize that promoting bands is an actual business. Any promoter that tells you that they don’t pay themselves at least something is a lying liar face telling lies out of their lie hole. Most people don’t realize that there is overhead. You have to pay for the flyers, posters, and now Facebook ads. Let’s not forget the most important thing, the bands. We’ll get to that part in a minute. Basically, it costs money. Money that will come out of your pocket if you’re not smart. I always paid myself on average of 15% of the door. That way my costs are covered.

The most important thing when it comes to pay is the bands. The most common arrangement will be the door deal. This is really the route you want to take when you’re starting off, since you’ll mainly be booking local talent. Sure, it’s great to work out a door deal with everyone. That means that whatever money is collected at the door is divided up among the bands after the venue takes their cut.

Right now you’re probably wondering, “Why does the venue get a cut of the money?” Well, here’s the reason. The venue has to pay a sound engineer. The sound engineer runs the audio board and makes sure that the band sounds good. It’s a job that the average Joe off the street can do. It’s job that requires skill and training.

After you’ve been booking and promoting, you’ll probably start making a name for yourself. That’s when touring acts will start contacting you to book shows. Some of these bands will ask for a guarantee. This is where things can go wrong. First let me explain what a guarantee is. A guarantee is a set cost for a band to play. This is something that can be negotiated. You also have to make sure that you charge the appropriate amount for admission.

Coming up in the next, I’ll be talking about how to get people to come to your event.


About the Author:

Ben Rose - Host of Motor City Juke Joint on New Radio Media

 

Ben Rose
Host of Motor City Juke Joint on New Radio Media.
Watch it LIVE every Tuesday and Thursday at 7 pm EST!
Catch up on episodes you missed – all are available On Demand.

Get it on Google Play

Download on the App Store

 

Detroit Radio - where is the Talent
February 22, 2018

Detroit Radio – Your Audience Isn’t Listening

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Detroit radio we hardly recognize you!  Where are the radio personalities?  Where has all the talent gone?  You’ve stopped talking to us!

The idea that on-air talent is irrelevant in music radio is the product of the corporate “bean counter.” The practice of voice tracking music sets from a distant studio is like giving relationship advice with recorded message! The personal touch and the connection with the listener are totally absent, and the ability to hold the audience beyond the song diminishes. The station becomes more of a juke box; an impersonal music delivery system that inhibits the ability to attract – and interact with – an audience. What the cost-cutters forget is that when you stop talking to your audience, they stop listening.

The history of Detroit radio – and radio around the country – proves that a strong wave of change can carry a huge audience along with it. The addition of FM to the radio mix back in the 60’s created new music formats, thanks to the clear fidelity of the signal and the ability to broadcast in stereo. The resulting disruption of the norm was instantaneous! The Rock Revolution spread like a California wildfire. It changed the landscape by providing a new vehicle to an entire generation starving for a voice. It changed radio, and society, forever.

Fifty years later, streaming is offering even more to the current generations – especially the “digital natives” who demand agile platforms to match their mobile lifestyle and social media networks. Today’s audience has an insatiable need for something new, something easy to access and something they can easily share. New Radio Media meets this need! The live streaming/on demand format offers opportunities for local talent (including Detroit radio and television talent) businesses, and organizations to express themselves, and spotlight their talents and products in a very personal, flexible, and interactive format. The New Radio Media streaming network is designed to offer a way to create unique content in the digital space; working with a dedicated and experienced team to help accelerate the process. The NRM platform is designed to accommodate anyone who wants to build and grow their brand and increase their recognition and influence in the digital universe. If you want to know where Detroit’s talent is heading, check out New Radio Media!

About the Author:

Buzz Van Houten, Executive Director
New Radio Media

Buzz Van Houten is a broadcast professional with over three decades of experience in Detroit Radio and major market broadcasting. A seasoned radio senior executive, his career spanned 19 years with ABC as a Local, National, and General Sales Manager, during the time major Detroit radio stations WRIF FM, WJR AM and WHYT FM were owned and operated by ABC. He was a General Manager at WLLZ FM for eight years, and also served as General Manager of ESPN radio during the transition from the original format to ESPN. Buzz has a wealth of experience, plus an understanding of current trends and opportunities – within the broadcasting industry and beyond.