Tag Archives: musician



Media Interview
March 7, 2018

The Joys of Interviewing

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Something that most people don’t realize is that when you are having a conversation with someone, you are essentially interviewing them. That’s why when you interview someone, you should be having a conversation. We’ve all heard or watched interviews where the host is going through a list of questions. It’s boring.

Every interviewer has their own style. Personally, if I can get a 30-minute interview out of a two-hour conversation, that’s a success. My approach to interviewing a guest is to make them feel comfortable – maybe even talk about things that aren’t directly related to what they’re doing. I slowly work my questions in. Not in a direct way. I want them to walk away wondering if they had just been interviewed, or if they just hung out for two hours talking to a friend. To me, that is what makes Motor City Juke Joint  on New Radio Media so unique and personal. It’s people talking about music.

I’ve done well over 100 interviews. Some of them were live on air. Some of them were recorded. A few of those will never see the light of day. There’s one in particular that stands out. I won’t name the person that I interviewed, because he is rather well known. The interview was conducted via phone. He was on tour and didn’t have time to stop by the studio. Anyone that has met me, or listened to my show, knows that I’m a talker. This person… was not. He responded with mostly one or two word answers. Sometimes with a sentence. It wasn’t until I brought up his other career as a college professor that the interview changed direction. Instead of talking about music, we started talking about math and how it was relaxing to him. He told me that when he gets off stage he immediately starts working on math equations. That’s how he unwinds after a performance.

Whether you’re a musician, actor, or even a broadcaster – everyone needs to decompress. Some drink and socialize. Others prefer quiet.  Some like to exercise their minds. We all have our own way.

About the Author:

Ben Rose - Host of Motor City Juke Joint on New Radio Media

 

Ben Rose
Host of Motor City Juke Joint on New Radio Media.
Watch it LIVE every Tuesday and Thursday at 7 pm EST!
Catch up on episodes you missed – all are available On Demand.

Get it on Google Play

Download on the App Store

 

So You Want to Be a Promter
March 22, 2018

So You Want to be a Promoter – part 1

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Let me start off by asking, “What the hell is wrong with you?”

All kidding aside, that’s really a question that you should ask yourself. I’ve been a promoter for close to 13 years now. Initially, I thought that it was going to be easy. I thought that it wouldn’t really cost anything – that I was going to do it for the music. In reality, it was hard, and expensive.

Most people don’t realize that promoting bands is an actual business. Any promoter that tells you that they don’t pay themselves at least something is a lying liar face telling lies out of their lie hole. Most people don’t realize that there is overhead. You have to pay for the flyers, posters, and now Facebook ads. Let’s not forget the most important thing, the bands. We’ll get to that part in a minute. Basically, it costs money. Money that will come out of your pocket if you’re not smart. I always paid myself on average of 15% of the door. That way my costs are covered.

The most important thing when it comes to pay is the bands. The most common arrangement will be the door deal. This is really the route you want to take when you’re starting off, since you’ll mainly be booking local talent. Sure, it’s great to work out a door deal with everyone. That means that whatever money is collected at the door is divided up among the bands after the venue takes their cut.

Right now you’re probably wondering, “Why does the venue get a cut of the money?” Well, here’s the reason. The venue has to pay a sound engineer. The sound engineer runs the audio board and makes sure that the band sounds good. It’s a job that the average Joe off the street can do. It’s job that requires skill and training.

After you’ve been booking and promoting, you’ll probably start making a name for yourself. That’s when touring acts will start contacting you to book shows. Some of these bands will ask for a guarantee. This is where things can go wrong. First let me explain what a guarantee is. A guarantee is a set cost for a band to play. This is something that can be negotiated. You also have to make sure that you charge the appropriate amount for admission.

Coming up in the next, I’ll be talking about how to get people to come to your event.


About the Author:

Ben Rose - Host of Motor City Juke Joint on New Radio Media

 

Ben Rose
Host of Motor City Juke Joint on New Radio Media.
Watch it LIVE every Tuesday and Thursday at 7 pm EST!
Catch up on episodes you missed – all are available On Demand.

Get it on Google Play

Download on the App Store