Tag Archives: medicine



Prescription for Your Health on New Radio Media - Leg Cramp
March 12, 2018

Prescription for Your Health – Leg Cramps

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Almost everyone has experienced the agony of leg cramps at night, but is there a way to prevent them? Unfortunately, the answer appears to be no, but it is possible to limit your risk of nocturnal leg cramps.

First, it is of paramount importance to make sure you are drinking plenty of fluids, since dehydration can trigger cramps. During the day women should avoid high heels or completely flat shoes as this will put great strain on your calf muscles. You should instead wear comfortable shoes with low heels. If you are prone to nocturnal leg cramps then I strongly advise my patients to take a few minutes to massage and stretch your calf muscles before going to bed. In addition, you want to avoid tucking your sheets and blankets too tightly as this can actually put pressure on your feet especially if you sleep on your back causing you to point your feet thereby thereby triggering a cramp. Another trick to try is sleeping on your back or your stomach with your feet hanging off the end of the mattress.

One old time remedy that still works is an item you’ll find in the supermarket and that is tonic water. What is it about tonic water that has therapeutic value, you may ask? Well, the active ingredient in tonic water is Quinine which is a wonderful elixir for this problem. There are several medications that have been tried for leg cramps as these include the anti-hypertensive and anti-arrythmia drug Verapamil as well as Benzodiazapines (tranquilizers) such as Clonopin or Ativan. Finally, if you experience a night time leg cramp then immediately pull your toes toward your knee and rub the muscle. Pointing your toe will only make the cramp tighten and will greatly increase your pain.


Dr. Bragman - Host of Prescription for Your Health on New Radio Media

About the Author:

Dr. Jim Bragman
Host of Prescription For Your Health on New Radio Media

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store

A highly successful Doctor with a practice in West Bloomfield, Michigan, Jim is also an award-winning broadcast journalist who has served as the “on-air” medical expert for various Detroit radio stations, including: WWJ Radio in Detroit (CBS owned and operated), WJBK-TV (Detroit’s FOX network affiliate) and WKBD in Detroit. He has over 20 years of experience in the medical media industry, including nine years as a national radio medical expert for CNN.

Dr. Jim Bragman has 30 years of experience in private practice, and is also a clinical teacher of medicine at the Wayne State and Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medical Schools.

Prescription for your Health on New Radio Media - Eat Your Crust
April 3, 2018

Prescription for Your Health – Eat Your Crust

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When it comes to your good health –  don’t forget to eat the crust!

How many of us at one time or another decided to cut off the bread crust when making a sandwich? Well it turns out that when you toss out the crust you are actually throwing away the best part of the bread in terms of antioxidants. Antioxidants are helpful in fighting cancer and bolstering your immune system in general. The healthiest breads are either multigrain or nine grain whole wheat varieties. These breads contain fiber which helps your heart as well as protecting you from colonic polyps and colon cancer.

There is an antioxidant released in the baking process that develops as a result of a chemical reaction during cooking. Researchers have found that the crust of the bread contains as much of the antioxidant as the rest of the loaf. Now it’s still too early to know how much crust should be eaten, but tests with rats strongly indicate that the regular intake can stop the formation of precancerous polyps in the colon. It also helps in treating the Rheumatological and autoimmune diseases where the body engages in friendly fire against itself. Antioxidants keep the white blood cells known as lymphocytes from attacking your immune system. This includes diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, Sjogren’s Syndrome, Autoimmune Hepatitis, and Multiple Sclerosis.

In addition to crust, regular exercise and cutting down on alcohol consumption can also reduce your risk of heart disease and autoimmune disease, as well as your risk of colon cancer.


Dr. Bragman - Host of Prescription for Your Health on New Radio Media

About the Author:

Dr. Jim Bragman
Host of Prescription For Your Health on New Radio Media

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store

A highly successful Doctor with a practice in West Bloomfield, Michigan, Jim is also an award-winning broadcast journalist who has served as the “on-air” medical expert for various Detroit radio stations, including: WWJ Radio in Detroit (CBS owned and operated), WJBK-TV (Detroit’s FOX network affiliate) and WKBD in Detroit. He has over 20 years of experience in the medical media industry, including nine years as a national radio medical expert for CNN.

Dr. Jim Bragman has 30 years of experience in private practice, and is also a clinical teacher of medicine at the Wayne State and Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medical Schools.

Prescription for Your Health - Caring for Alzheimer's Patients
April 17, 2018

Prescription for Your Health – Caring for Alzheimer’s Patients

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One of the most difficult and vexing problems that I see in my practice are the trials and tribulations of a family taking care of a loved one with Alzheimers.
  • Statistics state that, of the millions of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, 75% of their care is provided at home.
  • According to the National Alliance for Caregiving, during the past year 67 million Americans provide care to a family member, or friend.

If you’re a caregiver, you know about having to help with the activities of daily living including bathing, shopping, cooking, feeding and making arrangements for medical care. Behavioral issues are another major problem for the caretaker, as well as for the stricken person. In addition, caretakers need to cope with their own anxieties and fears.  Fortunately, there are books and organizations that can help you in this quest. One guide I recommend is from Dr. Peter Roger and Dr. Ann Morrison of John Hopkins Medical School who have written a guide called “Caring For A Loved One With Alzheimer’s Disease.” The other is “The 36 Hour Day,” which explains the tenets and underpinnings for the family caretaker.

These books explore such issues as:

  • When is it time to take away the car?
  • How do you modify the home for people with dementia (this includes avoiding obstacles and removing throw rugs)?
  • How to deal with troubling behaviors such as wandering and inappropriate outbursts, rage, and obstreperous behavior.
  • How do you handle a loved one with delusions and hallucinations?
  • What can you do when your loved one acts in an embarrassing way in public?
  • Should friends and neighbors be notified?

Finally, the ultimate decision is when is it time to place a loved one in a nursing home facility – and what options exist to cover the cost.

So, if you are a caretaker , remember you are not alone in your fears and frustrations. There are excellent resources available to help assuage your concerns.


Dr. Bragman - Host of Prescription for Your Health on New Radio Media

About the Author:

Dr. Jim Bragman
Host of Prescription For Your Health on New Radio Media

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store

A highly successful Doctor with a practice in West Bloomfield, Michigan, Jim is also an award-winning broadcast journalist who has served as the “on-air” medical expert for various Detroit radio stations, including: WWJ Radio in Detroit (CBS owned and operated), WJBK-TV (Detroit’s FOX network affiliate) and WKBD in Detroit. He has over 20 years of experience in the medical media industry, including nine years as a national radio medical expert for CNN.

Dr. Jim Bragman has 30 years of experience in private practice, and is also a clinical teacher of medicine at the Wayne State and Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medical Schools.

Prescription for Your Health - Depression
March 25, 2018

Prescription for Your Health – Depression

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One of the most common problems that I see in private practice is depression, and it turns out that it can be worse than some chronic diseases, and it can make other conditions worse. Researchers writing in the British Medical Journal “Lancet” say depression can be more damaging to your everyday health than chronic diseases such as Arthritis, Diabetes, and Asthma. In addition, people suffering from a wide range of chronic diseases who also experience depression almost inevitably have a poorer prognosis for the chronic condition. The researchers conclude as a result impairs the overall health state more than other diseases. It also shows the importance of treating depression, which we are very capable of doing today with a combination of psychotherapy and medication.

The problem for many who suffer from depression is embarrassment. Patients are are afraid to tell their doctors about their bouts of depression. One of the mnemonics that I use in practice to diagnose depression is SIGECAPS.

  • S stands for sleep. People who are depressed either are exhausted after a full 8 or 9 hours of sleep, or awake up in the middle of the night and have trouble falling back asleep.
  • I stands for a lack of interest in pursuing enjoyable activities such as sex or going out to eat or other social functions.
  • G stands for feeling guilty about one’s lot in life.
  • E stands for low energy. Depressed people will feel tired all the time.
  • C stands for concentration. People will have trouble focusing and it will take them double or triple the time to absorb new information.
  • A stands for appetite and most of the time a person will go on a comfort eating binge and gain weight. However, about 10% of the time they will lose 5-10% of their body weight.
  • P stands for psychomotor retardation, which is a fancy way of saying that people who know you well will ask if you if you’re moving in slow motion.
  • stands for feeling hopeless, worthless, and ultimately suicidal.

So, in conclusion, there is no reason to shy away from a condition that is completely understandable and, in most cases, completely treatable. If you don’t manage the depression then you will not be able to manage your chronic condition, because the depression is actually making it worse.


Dr. Bragman - Host of Prescription for Your Health on New Radio Media

About the Author:

Dr. Jim Bragman
Host of Prescription For Your Health on New Radio Media

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store

A highly successful Doctor with a practice in West Bloomfield, Michigan, Jim is also an award-winning broadcast journalist who has served as the “on-air” medical expert for various Detroit radio stations, including: WWJ Radio in Detroit (CBS owned and operated), WJBK-TV (Detroit’s FOX network affiliate) and WKBD in Detroit. He has over 20 years of experience in the medical media industry, including nine years as a national radio medical expert for CNN.

Dr. Jim Bragman has 30 years of experience in private practice, and is also a clinical teacher of medicine at the Wayne State and Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medical Schools.

Prescription for Your Health - Prostate Cancer
May 6, 2018

Prescription for Your Health – Prostate Cancer Screening

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One of the major controversies in medicine today is: what is the role of screening in prostate cancer?

This includes the role of the blood test known as OSA or Prostate Specific Antigen in the diagnosis of this prevalent condition. Terms you need to understand include lead time and length time bias. This means that if we diagnose a prostate cancer today versus picking up the diagnosis 1 or 2 years later, then would that make an overall difference in a loved one’s prognosis and life expectancy.

There are conflicting reports in the medical literature regarding this subject. My personal take on this issue is that researchers who write these papers are in ivory towers and most concerned with cost effectiveness, which is a euphemistic way of saying “what is a life really worth?” At this time, we use a cancer screening scale known as the Gleason Score to determine the degree of aggressiveness of a prostate cancer. The score varies from 2 to 10,  with 10 being the grade that is most likely to spread. When cancers are in the intermediate, range namely 5-7, the question arises whether we should treat immediately or employ “watchful waiting”. The risk with “watchful waiting” is once a cancer leaves the prostate capsule itself and spreads on to either the local lymph nodes or bone then it becomes exceedingly difficult to treat over the long term.

Although we have made strides in the treatment of prostate cancer in the last few years and have several newer newer drug combinations available, the prognosis remains tenuous at best. We still are not at the point with genetic testing markers to determine who is a candidate for watchful waiting. In contradistinction, if we treat I explain to patients that the two worst symptoms that you might experience would include some urinary incontinence that would require a Depends cloth for a period of time, and erectile dysfunction that generally can be treated with drugs such as Cialis or Viagra or a vacuum pump device. Although sub-optimal, I explain to patients and their families that at least you are alive. I have seen patients who have a preliminary Gleason score of 6 after their prostate biopsy before their operation and at surgery are at an 8. In these cases “watchful waiting” would have resulted in the patient’s death within a few years. So as a result, at this time I am still a strong proponent of routine screening with PSA for prostate cancer. This view is substantiated by the American Urological Society.


Dr. Bragman - Host of Prescription for Your Health on New Radio Media

About the Author:

Dr. Jim Bragman
Host of Prescription For Your Health on New Radio Media

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store

A highly successful Doctor with a practice in West Bloomfield, Michigan, Jim is also an award-winning broadcast journalist who has served as the “on-air” medical expert for various Detroit radio stations, including: WWJ Radio in Detroit (CBS owned and operated), WJBK-TV (Detroit’s FOX network affiliate) and WKBD in Detroit. He has over 20 years of experience in the medical media industry, including nine years as a national radio medical expert for CNN.

Dr. Jim Bragman has 30 years of experience in private practice, and is also a clinical teacher of medicine at the Wayne State and Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medical Schools.

Prescription for Your Health - Opioid Crisis
April 12, 2018

Prescription for Your Health – The Opioid Epidemic

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One of the hottest topics today is the national opioid epidemic.

This national crisis is a culmination of may factors, ultimately resulting in poor coping mechanisms on the part of patient, and ineffective and fearful prescribing patterns on the part of physicians.

A couple of years ago, there was a particularly poignant television interview between Dr. Mehmet Oz and Steven Tyler of Arrowsmith fame. Mr. Tyler is no stranger to the world of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. He points out correctly that the number one drug pushers in the country are physicians. For example, almost anyone going into an emergency room or urgent care center with any degree of back spasms is going to walk out with a prescription for Norco, Vicodin, Tylenol 3 or 4, Lortab,OxyContin, or other Opioid equivalent products. This is not for treating back pain resulting from a kidney stone, or a rare central ruptured disc that clearly requires Morphine or Dilaudid. Rather the patient demands something “strong” for their back pain and physicians are concerned about patient satisfaction surveys and the social media implications that evolve from their medical decisions. As a result, rather than prescribing a course of non steroidal anti inflammatory agents such as Motrin or Aleve, or even a short course of Prednisone in conjunction with a muscle relaxant, physicians tend to take least confrontational and easy course of action. This is despite medical evidence to the contrary of the lack of effectiveness of opioids in musculoskeletal pain.

In the office setting, it does take more time to explain to patients that the right course of treatment is conservative in the use of musculoskeletal pain medications. I may even suffer some remonstrance on the part of the patient. Physicians need to convey that this is the medically correct and ethical thing to do. Patients also need to know that time is a great healer and with ice, moist heat, non steroidal anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxants, and physical therapy, their pain will be alleviated in a reasonable time period.

The opioids have the side effects of mental obtundation, dizziness, and constipation which create a whole new set of problems. Of course, in every practice there are exceptions to the rule where certain patients will require moderate doses of opioids for a reasonable quality of life. These situations must be evaluated on a case by case basis and require a strong relationship and an element of trust between the doctor and the patient.


Dr. Bragman - Host of Prescription for Your Health on New Radio Media

About the Author:

Dr. Jim Bragman
Host of Prescription For Your Health on New Radio Media

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store

A highly successful Doctor with a practice in West Bloomfield, Michigan, Jim is also an award-winning broadcast journalist who has served as the “on-air” medical expert for various Detroit radio stations, including: WWJ Radio in Detroit (CBS owned and operated), WJBK-TV (Detroit’s FOX network affiliate) and WKBD in Detroit. He has over 20 years of experience in the medical media industry, including nine years as a national radio medical expert for CNN.

Dr. Jim Bragman has 30 years of experience in private practice, and is also a clinical teacher of medicine at the Wayne State and Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medical Schools.

Health Insurance
May 10, 2018

Prescription for Your Health – Health Insurance

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Before you go to your doctor, you need to know the ins and outs of your health insurance plan.
  • What is your deductible?
  • Do you have a co-pay?
  • Is this doctor in your network?
  • Do you have a PPO, HMO, Medicare or Medicaid?

Choosing a plan can be tricky. Unfortunately, you get what you pay for. You may save money on the front end but you will experience many obstacles when you attempt to see top notch specialists from top hospitals. So as the old adage goes, “An ounce of prevention is often worth a pound of cure.”

Things to consider…

What does “after deductible” mean.
It means that for services subject to coinsurance, your insurance company will pay 100%, fully covered. As an example, say you have a plan with a $1,000 deductible with 0% coinsurance. You would need to pay $1 ,000 off the bat, then the coinsurance comes into play.

Do copays count towards out of pocket max?
Starting in 2014, copays must count toward the out-of-pocket maximum. This standard is mandated by healthcare reform and applies to all plans, except grandfathered ones. However, it must be noted that whether copays count toward the deductible depends on the plan/carrier.

What does it mean when there is no copay?
In the United States, copayment is a payment defined in an insurance policy and paid by an insured person each time a medical service is accessed.

Is it better to have a higher deductible for health insurance?
For the insurer, a higher deductible means you are responsible for a greater amount of your initial health care costs, saving them money. For you, the benefit comes in lower monthly premiums. If you have a high-deductible plan, you are eligible for a Health Savings Account (HSA).

What does it mean if there is no deductible?
If your coinsurance is 70/30, this means that you are responsible for paying 30% of your total medical bill and your insurance company is responsible for the other 70% (after your deductible is met).

Here are some commonly used insurance and healthcare terms (in alphabetical order):

Allowed Amount – The highest amount your insurance company will cover (pay) for a service.

Benefit Period – When services are covered under your plan. It also defines the time when benefit maximums, deductibles and coinsurance limits build up. It has a start and end date. It is often one calendar year for health insurance plans.

For example: You may have a plan with a benefit period of January 1 through December 31 that covers 10 physical therapy visits. The 11th or more session will not be covered.

Coinsurance – A certain percent you must pay each benefit period after you have paid your deductible. This payment is for covered services only. You may still have to pay a copay. For example: Your plan might cover 80 percent of your medical bill. You will have to pay the other 20 percent. The 20 percent is the coinsurance.

Coinsurance Limit (or Maximum) – The most you will pay in coinsurance costs during a benefit period.

Condition – An injury, ailment, disease, illness or disorder.

Contract – The agreement between an insurance company and the policyholder.

Copayment (Copay) – The amount you pay to a healthcare provider at the time you receive services. You may have to pay a copay for each covered visit to your doctor, depending on your plan. Not all plans have a copay.

Covered Charges – Charges for covered services that your health plan paid for. There may be a limit on covered charges if you receive services from providers outside your plan’s network of providers.

Covered Person – Any person covered under the plan.

Covered Service – A healthcare provider’s service or medical supplies covered by your health plan. Benefits will be given for these services based on your plan.

Deductible – The amount you pay for your healthcare services before your health insurer pays. Deductibles are based on your benefit period (typically a year at a time). For example: If your plan has a $2,000 annual deductible, you will be expected to pay the first $2,000 toward your healthcare services. After you reach $2,000, your health insurer will cover the rest of the costs.

Emergency Medical Condition – A medical problem with sudden and severe symptoms that must be treated quickly. In an emergency, a person with no medical training and an average knowledge of health/medicine could reasonably expect the problem could:

  • Put a person’s health at serious risk.
  • Put an unborn child’s health at serious risk.
  • Result in serious damage to the person’s body and how his or her body works.
  • Result in serious damage of a person’s organ or any part of the person.

Experimental or Investigational Drug, Device, Medical Treatment or Procedure – These are not approved by the US. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or are not considered the standard of FSA (Flexible Spending Account) – An FSA is often set up through an employer plan. It lets you set aside pre-tax money for common medical costs and dependent care. FSA funds must be used by the end of the term-year. It will be sent back to the employer if you don’t use it. Check with your employer’s Human Resources team. The can provide a list of FSA-qualified costs that you can purchase directly or be reimbursed for.

HMO (Health Maintenance Organization) – Offers healthcare services only with specific HMO providers. Under an HMO plan, you might have to choose a primary care doctor. This doctor will be your main healthcare provider. The doctor will refer you to other HMO specialists when needed.
Services from providers outside the HMO plan are hardly ever covered except for emergencies.

HRA (Health Reimbursement Account) – An account that lets an employer set aside funds for healthcare costs. These funds go to reimburse Covered Services paid for by employees who take part. An HRA has tax benefits for employer and employees.

HSA (Health Savings Account) – An account that lets you save for future medical costs. Money put in the account is not subject to federal income tax when deposited. Funds can build up and be used year to year. They are not required to be spent in a single year. HSAs must be paired with certain high-deductible health insurance plans (HDHP).

Health Assessment – A health survey that measures your current health, health risks and quality of life.

In-patient Services – Services received when admitted to a hospital and a room and board charge is made.

Legal Guardian – The person who takes care of a child and makes healthcare decision for the child. This person is the natural parent or was made caretaker by a court of law.

Long-term Insurance – A type of health insurance that covers certain services over a set amount of time (typically a 12-month period).

Medical Care – Medical services received from a healthcare provider or facility to treat a condition. Medically Necessary (or Medical Necessity) – Services, supplies or prescription drugs that are needed to diagnose or treat a medical condition.

Also, an insurer must decide if this care is:

  • Accepted as standard practice. It can’t be experimental or investigational.
  • Not just for your convenience or the convenience of a provider.
  • The right amount or level of service that can be given to you.

Example: In-patient care is medically necessary if your condition can’t be treated properly as an outpatient service.

Medicare – A federal program for people age 65 or older that pays for certain healthcare expenses.

Network Provider/ln-network Provider – A healthcare provider who is part of a plan’s network. Non-covered Charges – Charges for services and supplies that are not covered under the health plan. Examples of non-covered charges may include things like acupuncture, weight loss surgery or marriage counseling. Consult your plan for more information.

Non-network Provider/Out-of-network Provider – A healthcare provider who is not part of a plan’s network. Costs associated with out-of-network providers may be higher or not covered by your plan. Consult your plan for more information.

Outpatient Services – Services that do not need an overnight stay in a hospital. These services are often provided in a doctor’s office, hospital or clinic.

Out-of-pocket Cost – Cost you must pay. Out-of-pocket costs vary by plan and each plan has a maximum out of pocket (MOOP) cost. Consult your plan for more information.

PPO (Preferred Provider Organization) – A type of insurance plan that offers more extensive coverage for the services of healthcare providers who are part of the plan’s network, but still offers some coverage for providers who are not part of the plan’s network. PPO plans generally offer more flexibility than HMO plans, but premiums tend to be higher.

Prescription Drug – Any medicine that may not be given without a prescription because of federal or state law.

Premium – Payments you make to your insurance provider to keep your coverage. The payments are due at certain times.

Provider (Healthcare Provider) – A hospital, facility, physician or other licensed healthcare professional.

Short-term Insurance – A type of health insurance that covers certain services for a set time period (6 months or less). Learn more about short-term insurance.

Urgent Care Provider – A provider of services for health problems that need medical help right away but are not emergency medical conditions.

Coinsurance – The percentage of costs of a covered health care service you pay (20%, for example) after you’ve paid your deductible.
Let’s say your health insurance plan’s allowed amount for an office visit is $100 and your coinsurance is 20%.
If you’ve paid your deductible: You pay 20% of $100, or $20. The insurance company pays the rest.
If you haven’t met your deductible: You pay the full allowed amount, $100.

Example of coinsurance with high medical costs:

Generally speaking, plans with low monthly premiums have higher coinsurance, and plans with higher monthly premiums have lower coinsurance.
Let’s say the following amounts apply to your plan and you need a lot of treatment for a serious condition. Allowable costs are $12,000.
Deductible: $3,000
Coinsurance: 20%
Out-of-pocket maximum: $6,850
You’d pay all of the first $3,000 (your deductible).
You’ll pay 20% of the remaining $9,000, or $1,800 (your coinsurance).
So your total out-of-pocket costs would be $4,800 — your $3,000 deductible plus your $1,800 coinsurance.
If your total out-of-pocket costs reach $6,850, you’d pay only that amount, including your deductible and coinsurance. The insurance company would pay for all covered services for the rest of your plan year.

Understanding these terms – and a careful review of your insurance policy – can help you make smart decisions about your insurance and your healthcare.

 


Dr. Bragman - Host of Prescription for Your Health on New Radio Media

About the Author:

Dr. Jim Bragman
Host of Prescription For Your Health on New Radio Media

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store

A highly successful Doctor with a practice in West Bloomfield, Michigan, Jim is also an award-winning broadcast journalist who has served as the “on-air” medical expert for various Detroit radio stations, including: WWJ Radio in Detroit (CBS owned and operated), WJBK-TV (Detroit’s FOX network affiliate) and WKBD in Detroit. He has over 20 years of experience in the medical media industry, including nine years as a national radio medical expert for CNN.

Dr. Jim Bragman has 30 years of experience in private practice, and is also a clinical teacher of medicine at the Wayne State and Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medical Schools.

Neck Pain - Prescription for Your Health - New Radio Media
March 19, 2018

Prescription for Your Health – Neck Pain

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One of the leading causes of lost work that I see in my office is neck pain, but we don’t hear much about it the print, radio, or TV media. There are many things that cause neck pain including poor posture and repetitive positioning – especially during long periods of time in front of a computer. It can also be the result of trauma, such as whiplash caused by a car accident. This issue is especially germane in states like Michigan that has no fault laws; and there can be secondary gain issues when attorneys and insurance companies become involved.

Fortunately, most cases of neck pain resolve in a few days, but when it doesn’t then that’s a good time to see your doctor for a consultation. Your doctor will want to know if you are having any numbness, tingling, or weakness going down your arms or if you’re having difficulty walking. These are signs of either a herniated or ruptured disc. If these are accompanied by a loss of bowel or bladder function then your doctor will want to order an MRI or CT to rule out a cord compression of your spine. Luckily, these are rare occurrences in clinical practice.  In most cases of neck pain an anti-inflammatory such as Motrin or Aleve will alleviate your pain. Moist heat or ice you will also help you get relief.

You can avoid neck strain in your car by adjusting the head restraint so it sits as close to the top of your head as possible. When using a computer screen, make sure the center of the screen is slightly below eye level. If your workplace offers an adjustable desk, then this is your most ergonomic option. Sometimes sleeping on your back or stomach can help prevent neck pain.  Also, I should note that regular stretching and taking breaks can minimize your neck pain whether it’s the computer or from whiplash..

Finally, I would also like to mention that a cervical collar which was once the standard of treatment for whiplash is rarely used these days because it can actually slow the recovery process.


Dr. Bragman - Host of Prescription for Your Health on New Radio Media

About the Author:

Dr. Jim Bragman
Host of Prescription For Your Health on New Radio Media

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store

A highly successful Doctor with a practice in West Bloomfield, Michigan, Jim is also an award-winning broadcast journalist who has served as the “on-air” medical expert for various Detroit radio stations, including: WWJ Radio in Detroit (CBS owned and operated), WJBK-TV (Detroit’s FOX network affiliate) and WKBD in Detroit. He has over 20 years of experience in the medical media industry, including nine years as a national radio medical expert for CNN.

Dr. Jim Bragman has 30 years of experience in private practice, and is also a clinical teacher of medicine at the Wayne State and Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medical Schools.