Category: Community



September 29, 2017

Yom Kippur on Sabbath

0 comments

The great Rabbi Levi Yitzchok of Berdichev was very calm when Yom Kippur falls on Shabbat and explained why it was so. It is known we are commanded as to not write on Shabbat, that it is a desecration of the holy Shabbat! However, for saving a life one is allowed to write. And therefore G-d can only write us in for a year of life, since writing is only permitted for saving lives but for no other exception. We will surely be blessed and inscribed and sealed for a great year filled with all good both physically and spiritually!

Think about it!
Rabbi Tzvi Jacobson, Host of Let’s Talk Torah on the New Radio Media Community Channel

September 20, 2017

Apples and Honey

0 comments

On the night of Rosh Hashanah, it is customary to dip an apple in honey, and we add a prayer for a good and sweet year.

One could think that the main focus is on the “sweetness” of the new year. The truth is, the apple is actually the more important of the two. If one were to eat an apple on its own, he would recite the blessing over fruit; if one were to eat honey on its own the blessing would be, “ through Whose word everything came to be”. However, when we dip the apple in the honey we only make the blessing on the fruit, on the apple. This is because the apple is more important. Why? Because the apple is the symbol of life itself, since it comes from a tree, and Torah, our lifeblood, is called the tree of life.

While we all want a life full of sweetness the main object of our prayer is “life itself”. Let’s make sure we focus on what is most important, first.

(Rav Yitzchok Sender)

Think about it!
Rabbi Tzvi Jacobson, Host of Let’s Talk Torah on the New Radio Media Community Channel

Shavuot
May 16, 2018

Shavuot – Countdown or Count Up?

0 comments

When we think about launching a new program there is always a countdown to the launch, the score clock on a football game has a countdown. On the Second day of Passover, there is a count leading up to the holiday of Shavuot (Pentecost) which celebrates the receiving of the Torah. We count 49 days, and day 50 is the holiday of Shavuot. However instead of a countdown there is a count up. Day one, day two…. Day 49.

Why?

Perhaps the different ways of counting teach us our attitude. If your team is winning, you can’t wait until the buzzer sounds. However, receiving the Torah wasn’t an end but just a beginning. G-d gave us the Torah and said, now go learn. Keep going higher, never stop. That is our attitude towards receiving the Torah.

In that case, maybe we should have a count up to a new show?

Think about it!


About the Author

Rabbi Tzvi Jacobson, Host of Let’s Talk Torah on the New Radio Media Community Channel

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store

Let's Talk Torah on New Radio Media

I am the Director of Development and the 3rd Grade Judaic studies teacher for Yeshivas Darchei Torah located in Southfield, Michigan. In these roles, I am able to pursue both my passions; teaching children and meeting people from all walks of life who share an interest in the education of children.

I love to be challenged; whether in the classroom helping a child with learning or behavior difficulties, or helping Yeshivas Darchei Torah meet its financial obligation.

As a teacher, I like to keep my students guessing what’s next. Whether it’s puppet shows, stories, trips or programs, my classroom is always warm and exciting. I enjoy studying Torah, and I love to share.

Holocaust Remembrance
July 20, 2018

Who is a Hero?

0 comments

The story is told about a Holocaust survivor who went to a Rabbi and said, “I am mad at G-d.” The Rabbi asked the survivor, “Why?”

The man responded, “I watched starving people give some of their bread rations to a man in the concentration camp who had managed to smuggle a prayer book into the camp, for the opportunity to use his prayer book. How could he be so selfish to charge for the use of his prayer book. Therefore, I am angry at G-d.”

The Rabbi responded, “you are right, that man was selfish, but why don’t you look at all the people who were willing to give up their meager rations in order to pray?”

The 9th of Av, is the day that Jews around the world remember the many tragedies that have befallen the Jewish people, from the destruction of the two Temples to the recent Holocaust. When we remember the tragedy and the evil that exists in the world, we should also remember the heroes – those people who kept their head held high, and showed their enemies, you can’t take away my G-dliness, my humanity, who I am and what I believe in.

This lesson can be learned by taking a tour of a Holocaust museum, like the Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus in Farmington Hills MI. It is well worth your time.

Think about it!

For more, watch Let’s Talk Torah – Episode 47
July 19, 2018 – Special In-Studio guests Ruth Bergman and Sarah Saltzman from the Holocaust Memorial Center.

Get it on Google PlayDownload on the App Store


Rabbi Tzvi Jacobson, Host of Let’s Talk Torah on the New Radio Media Community Channel

Let's Talk Torah on New Radio Media

I am the Director of Development and the 3rd Grade Judaic studies teacher for Yeshivas Darchei Torah located in Southfield, Michigan. In these roles, I am able to pursue both my passions; teaching children and meeting people from all walks of life who share an interest in the education of children.

I love to be challenged; whether in the classroom helping a child with learning or behavior difficulties, or helping Yeshivas Darchei Torah meet its financial obligation.

As a teacher, I like to keep my students guessing what’s next. Whether it’s puppet shows, stories, trips or programs, my classroom is always warm and exciting. I enjoy studying Torah, and I love to share.

Let's Talk Torah - Where Are You?
August 30, 2018

Where are You?

0 comments

My wife and I recently made a Snapfish book with pictures representing everything that happened to us this year, the good and even the not so pleasant. As I was making the book with her I thought, Wow! we really had an amazing year – lots of things to be thankful for. Then I wondered, is this what Rosh Hashana is all about, looking back at what happened last year, praying for a good new year?  It seems like a pretty big task, and if I had a great year do I need to do anything different? Maybe the following story can help us out.

Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi was put in jail in Russia for his “religious activities.” The guards, of course, knew this and would attempt to bother the Rabbi. One of the guards asked, If your G-d knows everything. why did he call out to Adam, “where are you?” Doesn’t G-d know where Adam was?

The simple explanation is that G-d wanted to start a conversation with Adam, however Rabbi Shneur Zalman answered that the Torah is not just a story book but life lessons, “where are you” doesn’t mean where are you located, “where are you” means, why are you here in this world, what have you accomplished, what are your goals.

Adam symbolizes mankind, and we all need to be ready to answer this question, “where are you.” Let’s start with today. What have you done with your life, today? How have you made your day, and the day of those around you, better?

Maybe that is what we should be thinking about on Rosh Hashanah!

Think about it!


About the Author

Rabbi Tzvi Jacobson - Host of Let's Talk Torah

Rabbi Tzvi Jacobson
Host of Let’s Talk Torah on the New Radio Media Community Channel

I am the Director of Development and the 3rd Grade Judaic studies teacher for Yeshivas Darchei Torah located in Southfield, Michigan. In these roles, I am able to pursue both my passions; teaching children and meeting people from all walks of life who share an interest in the education of children.

I love to be challenged; whether in the classroom helping a child with learning or behavior difficulties, or helping Yeshivas Darchei Torah meet its financial obligation.

As a teacher, I like to keep my students guessing what’s next. Whether it’s puppet shows, stories, trips or programs, my classroom is always warm and exciting. I enjoy studying Torah, and I love to share.

 


Let's Talk Torah - New Radio MediaLet’s Talk Torah on New Radio Media – LIVE every Thursday at 3 pm EST

Get it on Google PlayDownload on the App Store

You don’t have to be Jewish to enjoy this weekly show on New Radio Media. Join Rabbi Tzvi Jacobson for thoughtful discussions and life lessons that are both universal and timely. As Rabbi Jacobson says, “think about it.”  Each show offers insight into various topics relating to faith; specifically the stories, lessons, and teachings of the Torah.

Advertising and sponsorship opportunities are available. Contact info@NewRadioMedia.com for details.


 

August 30, 2017

Feathers and Pillows

0 comments

A man approached the Chofetz Chaim (January 26, 1839 – September 15, 1933) and said, “I have spoken loshon harah (slander), how can I repent?”

The Chofetz Chaim told him, “Take a feather pillow, go to the town square, rip open the pillow and shake it out. Then come back to me.” The man did as he was instructed and then returned. The Chofetz Chaim said, “Now go and collect all the feathers.”

The man returned a few hours later with a handful of feathers. The Chofetz Chaim said, “This is how it works with loshon harah; once it leaves our mouths it takes on a life of its own and you can never get it back.”

In those days they only had word of mouth; slander could travel, but how far? Today, with the internet, when we write about another person it is global. Let’s think before we rip open the pillow and speak loshon harah.

Think about it!
Rabbi Tzvi Jacobson, Host of Let’s Talk Torah on the New Radio Media Community Channel

 

March 30, 2018

What’s With the Number 4?

0 comments

Did you ever notice how many times the number 4 comes up at the Passover seder?

There are
4 cups of wine,
4 questions,
4 sons, and
4 steps to the salvation from Egypt.

Is there anything special about this number in regards to Passover?

The Vilna Gaon (an 18th century Torah scholar) explains, during the time of the Temple, when a person wanted to thank G-d, he would bring a special thank you offering. There were 4 people who were required to bring this sacrifice (others could also bring this sacrifice but in 4 cases it was an obligation): a person who crossed a sea, a person who crossed a desert, a person who was healed, and a person who got out of jail. If you think about it, you will notice all these happened to the Jewish people when they left Egypt.

We went out into the desert, crossed the Red Sea, left the jail of Egypt, and the Talmud says all the sick were miraculously healed. The night of Passover is one in which we need to remember to thank G-d for all the miracles he did for us, and the number 4 helps us remember them.

Think about it!


About the Author

Rabbi Tzvi Jacobson, Host of Let’s Talk Torah on the New Radio Media Community Channel

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store

Let's Talk Torah on New Radio Media

I am the Director of Development and the 3rd Grade Judaic studies teacher for Yeshivas Darchei Torah located in Southfield, Michigan. In these roles, I am able to pursue both my passions; teaching children and meeting people from all walks of life who share an interest in the education of children.

I love to be challenged; whether in the classroom helping a child with learning or behavior difficulties, or helping Yeshivas Darchei Torah meet its financial obligation.

As a teacher, I like to keep my students guessing what’s next. Whether it’s puppet shows, stories, trips or programs, my classroom is always warm and exciting. I enjoy studying Torah, and I love to share.

Hide and Seek
April 16, 2018

Hide and Seek

0 comments
This week’s Torah lesson: G-d says to us, He will hide His face from us. What does that mean?

About a century ago, a university professor once challenged his students: Did G-d create everything that exists? When the students answered yes, the professor said, Well, if G-d created everything, then G-d created evil. Since we are defined by our works, we can assume G-d is evil. (Interesting philosophical question).

One student raised his hand, “Sir, I have a question. Does cold exist?”

“Of course cold exists!” replied the professor!

“Cold does not exist,” the young man replied, “according to the laws of physics, cold is the absence of heat. Cold just describes how we feel.” (at this point the professor should have stopped the conversation)

The student continued, “does darkness exist?”

The professor said, “yes it does!”

The student replied, “you are wrong, darkness is the absence of light.” The student then asked, “does evil exist?”
(Some people never realize when they are being set up.)

The professor answered, “yes, evil exists, we see it all the time.”

“No, sir,” said the student. “Evil does not exist on its own. Evil happens in the absence of G-d, Evil is the like the cold when there is no heat, or the darkness when there is no light.”

The young man’s name? Albert Einstein.

Whether the story is true or not, when the Torah tells us G-d will hide his face, and terrible things will happen, that is all because we forgot about G-d and we allowed evil to fill His place.

Looking around in our world today I would say,  “Think about it!”


About the Author

Rabbi Tzvi Jacobson, Host of Let’s Talk Torah on the New Radio Media Community Channel

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store

Let's Talk Torah on New Radio Media

I am the Director of Development and the 3rd Grade Judaic studies teacher for Yeshivas Darchei Torah located in Southfield, Michigan. In these roles, I am able to pursue both my passions; teaching children and meeting people from all walks of life who share an interest in the education of children.

I love to be challenged; whether in the classroom helping a child with learning or behavior difficulties, or helping Yeshivas Darchei Torah meet its financial obligation.

As a teacher, I like to keep my students guessing what’s next. Whether it’s puppet shows, stories, trips or programs, my classroom is always warm and exciting. I enjoy studying Torah, and I love to share.

March 15, 2018

Gratitude -Who is it for?

0 comments

The first two plagues, “blood” and “frogs” were started when Aaron hit the Nile River with his stick.

If Moses is the main player to lead the Jewish people out of Egypt why doesn’t he start the first two plagues himself? Rashi (a 12th century commentator) explains it would show a lack of gratitude on Moses’s part if he were to hit the water. When Moses was a baby and his parents put him in the river, the river did not engulf his basket, instead the basket survived until Pharaoh’s daughter came and took Moses out of the water. Therefore, Moses shows his gratitude to the river and the plague doesn’t start through him.

The question is: water is not a person, it has no feelings; what possible gratitude can there be toward an inanimate object?

When it comes to gratitude, I have to recognize a favor was done to me, and recognize what I received. However, besides the fact that “I owe you one,” when you do a favor for me, what kind of person would I be if I showed a lack of gratitude? I have to show gratitude because I need to understand the world doesn’t revolve around me. I get through life because of others. Moses has to show gratitude to the river, not for the river’s sake but for his own sake. Something to keep in mind when a favor is done for us.

Think about it!


About the Author

Rabbi Tzvi Jacobson, Host of Let’s Talk Torah on the New Radio Media Community Channel

I am the Director of Development and the 3rd Grade Judaic studies teacher for Yeshivas Darchei Torah located in Southfield, Michigan. In these roles, I am able to pursue both my passions; teaching children and meeting people from all walks of life who share an interest in the education of children. I love to be challenged; whether in the classroom helping a child with learning or behavior difficulties, or helping Yeshivas Darchei Torah meet its financial obligation.

As a teacher, I like to keep my students guessing what’s next. Whether it’s puppet shows, stories, trips or programs, my classroom is always warm and exciting. I enjoy studying Torah, and I love to share.